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YOUR DO’S AND DON’TS GUIDE ON CUPPING THERAPY

As we have stated in the previous blog, cupping therapy is beneficial in treating many health disorders. Physical Therapists perform this therapy among athletes as well as patients who seek non-surgical treatments.


But of course, every therapy is done with a thorough assessment and patient evaluation. There are also some things you have to consider before and after having a session. Do take note that these are mostly general advice and that it would still depend on your personal evaluation with your physician and physical therapists.


Before:

  • You have to eat before your treatment. The physical Therapist recommends an hour or so before. Some patients forget to eat a full meal right before their session. It’s a big no-no. You still have to give your body good nutrition.

  • Drink room-temperature water before your session. This helps a lot in flushing out your body of unwanted toxins.

  • Don’t shave the area 4 hours prior to your appointment. I know you feel shy about the extra hair, but trust me when I say that your PT won’t mind it.

  • Avoid exfoliating before your cupping therapy session. While it feels good to remove those dead skin cells, it’s important to follow this step as it may make your skin more sensitive to the heat.

After

  • Hydrate yourself! Give your lymphatic system the extra fluids it needs to flush your body of the toxins. Cupping acts as a support for your lymphatic system and your lymphatic system clears out cellular wastes from your body- and in turn, your body would need lots of water to do this.

  • Eat. Have a snack after your therapy. It’s nice if your pack yourself some fruits to snack on. Avoid consuming caffeine, alcohol, sugary foods and drinks, dairy, and processed meats. This will only delay your body’s ability to process the cupping treatment.

  • Stay warm. Stay away from the cold (air conditioner) and even from hot showers and saunas. Cover yourself where you had the cupping. It’s easier for you to get sick since your pores are still open. Give your body time to adjust and rest.

  • Rest. You might be surprised if you feel tired after the session- this is normal. It’s your body processing and expelling the toxins that were released during your cupping session. Take it easy, get extra rest.

  • No showering after your session for the rest of the day. Sounds weird? Well, the session actually opens up your pores The skin will also be more sensitive than usual. Taking a hot bath at this time can easily cause skin damage and inflammation. And if you take a cold shower, you will easily catch a cold because your pores are open.

  • After your cupping therapy session, the area might feel warmer. It’s also helpful to inform your therapist about it. If it’s too warm on your skin and it feels sunburned, apply some aloe to soothe the area and let your skin recover before going to another session.

  • Don’t exfoliate too much. Aggressive exfoliation makes your skin extra sensitive. After your cupping therapy session, wait for a couple of days.

  • Everyone responds differently to cupping. Some might feel better a day after the therapy while others need more time. Always remember that this treatment is done after a thorough medical evaluation and that your Physical Therapy will be with you and so, telling them if you feel any discomfort is important. So, if you’re interested in having a session, call us or any of your licensed Physical Therapists.

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